Journal of Blindness and Vision Impairment

Volume 2, Issue 2 (2021)

Research Article - Open Access
The Impact of Examination-Induced Stress on Intraocular Pressure of Ophthalmology Residents

Dr. Salh D1,2,*, Dr. Vianna J2, Dr. Zhang A1,2, Dr. Betsch D1,2, Dr. Shuba L1,2

1Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Canada

2Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, QEII Health Sciences Centre, Canada

*Corresponding Author:
Dr. Salh D
Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Canada; Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, QEII Health Sciences Centre, Canada.
E-mail: dominiquesalh@dal.ca

Received date: November 10, 2021; Accepted date: November 17, 2021; Published date: November 24, 2021

Citation: Salh D, Vianna J, Zhang A, Betsch D, Shuba L. The Impact of Examination-Induced Stress on Intraocular Pressure of Ophthalmology Residents. J Blind Vis Impair 2021;2(2):23-27.

Copyright: © 2021 Salh D, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that stress can elevate intraocular pressure in subjects exposed to academic tasks. In particular, an oral presentation has been shown to increase intraocular pressure, as well as other markers of stress such as heart rate, blood pressure, salivary cortisol, and subjective experience of anxiety measured through questionnaires. Our pilot study included a sample of 6 ophthalmology residents undergoing departmental examination. Intraocular pressure (IOP), blood pressure, and heart rate were measured at fivetime points: (1) 2 weeks before the exam, (2) the day before the exam, (3) the day of the exam, (4) the day after the exam, and (5) 2 weeks after the exam. Median values for IOP in the right and left eyes, heart rate, and blood pressure were compared between 2-time intervals for all outcome variables. Median values for IOP in the right and left eyes on the day before the exam were 12.25 ± 2.89 and 11.15 ± 3.31, respectively; on the day of the exam they were significantly higher at 13.50 ± 2.99 and 13.50 ± 3.12, respectively (p<0.05). Limited resources, including small sample size and potentially confounding external stressors experienced by subjects throughout the study period highlight the need for future research on this topic.

Keywords

Ophthalmology; Glaucoma; Intraocular pressure; Stress.